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  • AminoFix injection for Plantar Fasciitis & Achilles Tendonitis
  • Arch Pain
  • Bunions And Bursitis
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  • Comprehensive Foot And Ankle Surgery
  • Congenital Foot And Ankle Deformities
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  • Diabetic Foot Care
  • Flat Feet
  • Foot And Ankle Fractures
  • Fungal Skin Infections


    • Hammertoes
    • Laser treatment for fungal nails
    • Heel Spurs
    • Metatarsal Disorders
    • Pediatric Foot And Ankle Problems & Injuries
    • Plantar Fasciitis
    • Plantar Warts
    • Reconstructive Surgery Of The Foot And Ankle
    • Sports Related Injuries
    • Traumatic Surgery Of The Foot And Ankle
    • Treatment Of Charcot Foot And Ankle Deformities
    • Treatment Of Ingrown, Fungal And Thickened Nail Conditions

    Welcome to the Patient Information Center! Here you will find information about the most common foot and ankle ailments. Click on any of the issues below to find out more about specific problems and what treatment options are available. Here you will also find links to interesting websites pertaining to podiatry. If you have any questions, feel free to Contact Us through the website or give us a call!

    Common Ailments

    Helpful Information & Links

    The path to board certification by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery (ABPS) begins after graduating from an approved podiatric surgical residency program after which our doctors pass a rigorous written examination to become board qualified. Next, doctors spent up to 6 years of their initial practice time collecting various patient cases which demonstrate to the ABPS their decision-making, competency, and skills as a foot and ankle surgeon. After submission of these cases, detailed review, and acceptance to the ABPS, doctors sit for the ABPS oral examination held in Chicago, IL.

    • Dr. Paradoa has satisfied requirements by the ABPS to become board certified in Foot, Reconstructive Rearfoot/Ankle Surgery.

    Our patients can feel confident that they are being treated by a foot and ankle surgeon who has dedicated years of her education, training, and experience to achieving board certification status by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery.
    The American Board of Podiatric Surgery website has a wealth of information about podiatry and the requirements that must be met.

    A Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (DPM) is to the foot and ankle what a dentist is to the mouth, or an ophthalmologist to the eye — a doctor specializing in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of foot disorders resulting from injury or disease. A DPM makes independent judgments, prescribes medications and performs surgery. The human foot has a complex interrelation with the rest of the body which means that it may be the first area to show signs of serious conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Since the podiatric physician is often the first to detect symptoms of these disorders, he or she becomes a vital and sometimes lifesaving link in the health care team.

    The American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons is a professional society of thousands of foot and ankle surgeons. Their website contains a plethora of information about advances in podiatry and connects its members to share that knowledge.

    FootHealthFacts.org is the official consumer website of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. This is a wonderful resource of information! From what foot injuries Olympians have suffered from during the 2012 London Olympics to a growing trend in lawn mower accidents, you will find interesting, informative and compelling articles in the world of Podiatry.

    Patient Forms

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    What Is Flatfoot?
    PTTD2Flatfoot is often a complex disorder, with diverse symptoms and varying degrees of deformity and disability. There are several types of flatfoot, all of which have one characteristic in common: partial or total collapse (loss) of the arch.

     

    Other characteristics shared by most types of flatfoot include:

    • “Toe drift,” in which the toes and front part of the foot point outward
    • The heel tilts toward the outside and the ankle appears to turn in
    • A tight Achilles tendon, which causes the heel to lift off the ground earlier when walking and may make the problem worse
    • Bunions and hammertoes may develop as a result of a flatfoot.

    Flexible Flatfoot
    flatfoot3Flexible flatfoot is one of the most common types of flatfoot. It typically begins in childhood or adolescence and continues into adulthood. It usually occurs in both feet and progresses in severity throughout the adult years. As the deformity worsens, the soft tissues (tendons and ligaments) of the arch may stretch or tear and can become inflamed.

    The term “flexible” means that while the foot is flat when standing (weight-bearing), the arch returns when not standing.

    SymptomsFlatfoot
    Symptoms, which may occur in some persons with flexible flatfoot, include:

    • Pain in the heel, arch, ankle, or along the outside of the foot
    • “Rolled-in” ankle (over-pronation)
    • Pain along the shin bone (shin splint)
    • General aching or fatigue in the foot or leg
    • Low back, hip or knee pain.

    Diagnosis
    In diagnosing flatfoot, the foot and ankle surgeon examines the foot and observes how it looks when you stand and sit. X-rays are usually taken to determine the severity of the disorder. If you are diagnosed with flexible flatfoot but you don’t have any symptoms, your surgeon will explain what you might expect in the future.

    Non-surgical Treatment
    If you experience symptoms with flexible flatfoot, the surgeon may recommend non-surgical treatment options, including:

    • Activity modifications. Cut down on activities that bring you pain and avoid prolonged walking and standing to give your arches a rest.
    • Weight loss. If you are overweight, try to lose weight. Putting too much weight on your arches may aggravate your symptoms.
    • Orthotic devices. Your foot and ankle surgeon can provide you with custom orthotic devices for your shoes to give more support to the arches.
    • Immobilization. In some cases, it may be necessary to use a walking cast or to completely avoid weight-bearing.
    • Medications. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, help reduce pain and inflammation.
    • Physical therapy. Ultrasound therapy or other physical therapy modalities may be used to provide temporary relief.
    • Shoe modifications. Wearing shoes that support the arches is important for anyone who has flatfoot.

    When is Surgery Necessary?
    In some patients whose pain is not adequately relieved by other treatments, surgery may be considered. A variety of surgical techniques is available to correct flexible flatfoot, and one or a combination of procedures may be required to relieve the symptoms and improve foot function.

    In selecting the procedure or combination of procedures for your particular case, the foot and ankle surgeon will take into consideration the extent of your deformity based on the x-ray findings, your age, your activity level, and other factors. The length of the recovery period will vary, depending on the procedure or procedures performed.

    • Flexible Flatfoot

      What Is Flatfoot? Flatfoot is often a complex disorder, with diverse symptoms and varying degrees of deformity and disability. There are several types of flatfoot, all of which have one characteristic in common: partial or total collapse (loss) of the arch.   Other characteristics shared by most

      Read more

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    Vero Beach Location

    Monday:

    9:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Tuesday:

    9:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Wednesday:

    9:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Thursday:

    9:00 AM-5:00 PM

    Friday:

    9:00 AM-12:00 PM

    Saturday:

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    Sunday:

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    Sebastian Location

    Monday:

    Closed

    Tuesday:

    1:00 PM-5:00 PM

    Wednesday:

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    Thursday:

    1:00 PM-5:00 PM

    Friday:

    9:00 AM-12:00 PM

    Saturday:

    Closed

    Sunday:

    Closed